Posts Tagged Merrionette Park Fire Department

As seen around … Merrionette Park

Merrionette Park FD ambulances

Merrionette Park FD ambulances. Dennis McGuire, Jr. photo

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New ambulance for Merrionette Park (more)

This from Dennis McGuire, Jr.

New Merrionette Park FD Ambulance 2682
2009 Ford(F-450)/Horton
Serial# 6-190913931
X-Lombard, Illinois
Replacing Ambulance 2672 the 2004 Ford(E-350)/McCoy-Miller

Merrionette Park FD Ambulance 2682

Merrionette Park FD Ambulance 2682 – 2009 Ford F-450/Horton
Serial# 6-190913931 X-Lombard. Dennis McGuire, Jr. photo

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New ambulance for Merrionette Park

This from Dennis McGuire, Jr:

Merrionette Park just purchased a used 2009 Ford F-450/Horton (X-Lombard, Illinois) to replace a 2004 Ford E-350/McCoy Miller. The  old ambulance was 2672 and the newer one will be 2682.

 

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Of interest … Scott Stewart

Excerpts from the ChicagoSunTimes.com:

In Scott Stewart’s home office, photographs from his career highlights cover three of the four walls. The 61-year-old was laid off in 2013 from his job as a Chicago Sun-Times photographer. After 28 years working for the newspaper, he had to shift to his former career as a firefighter. 

Stewart is a third-generation firefighter. His paternal grandfather worked for the Rome Fire Department while his uncle served the Cave Springs Fire Department, both in Georgia.  Stewart and his father spent their Sundays visiting Chicago firehouses because his father was a friend of Chicago Fire Commissioner Robert J. Quinn.

He lost his father at age 8 and his mother when he was 16. That’s when he received a call from Quinn, then head of the Chicago Civil Defense Fire and Rescue Division, who encouraged Stewart to volunteer. He spent the next decade as a volunteer where he rose to the rank of captain.

After his time as a volunteer, he met Cathy, his wife of 35 years, who was a volunteer for the Merrionette Park Fire Department.

Stewart picked up his first camera at age 8, and his neighbor Fred Stein helped nurture a lifelong passion. Their friendship led to Stewart’s first job in journalism at the Chicago Daily News, where Stein was a photographer. 

During the 70s, Stewart worked for Central Camera. His boss let him open up a credit line allowing him to purchase his first camera. After returning home, he heard sirens and headed to the corner of 55th and Hyde Park, where two CTA buses had crashed. He took pictures of the scene and offered the photos to the Daily News, Sun-Times, Chicago Tribune and The Associated Press. By the time the papers bought his pictures, he earned almost $500, enough to pay off the store credit.

He studied photojournalism at Columbia College and graduated in 1977.  Years later, Stewart was hired by the Sun-Times as a darkroom technician and then a photographer. He once flew on Air Force One during Ronald Reagan’s presidency where Reagan called him into the plane’s Oval Office to congratulate him on the birth of his daughter.

The next year, he was covering Chicago violence which ultimately lead to a 2011 Pulitzer Prize. As school children walked on the sidewalk across the street from a liquor store, four gang members stood outside the shop and one had a gun. His photo captured a gun and drug deal, with the children in view.

Stewart’s 28-years with the Sun-Times ended on May 30, 2013 when the newspaper dismissed its photography staff.  He worked at the Evergreen Park Fire Department as head of the photo unit after the layoff, but couldn’t find work as a full-time photographer. Merrionette Park offered him his old job as a firefighter where he was recently promoted to lieutenant. In addition to working as Evergreen Park’s photographer, he’s a member of the MABAS Division 21 Cause and Origin Team.

He worked six jobs at one point, but all those efforts to pay the bills came to a screeching halt in March. Stewart was out of work after being diagnosed with a detached retina. He received an emergency vitrectomy in April that left him recovering for nine weeks. A short time later his retina was detached again. Another doctor promised he’d return to photography, and a second operation left him with a long recovery and no work for another six weeks. An online fundraising page helped him through that troubling time.

Despite everything Stewart says he wouldn’t change any of it. He’s stayed positive with the help of his three favorite things: photography, the fire department, and his beloved Cathy. He’ll always be a photographer and fire fan, and he having found a way to merge both passions into one.

thanks Dan

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4-Alarm fire in Calumet Park, 12-8-17 (more)

This from Brad Steinweg:

Pictures from Cal Park’s 4-11. Due to horrible traffic on I-94 I did not get there until most of the fire was knocked. Got a few apparatus photos though.

-Brad S.

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

fire scene photo

Brad Steinweg photo

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4-Alarm fire in Calumet Park, 12-8-17

This from Eric Haak:

I arrived at this incident in Calumet Park just short of an hour and a half after the first in engine. The rear of the building was brought under control about 10 minutes after I arrived and after that, there was not much firefighting left to shoot other than rigs. 

Alsip fire engine at fire scene

Eric Haak photo

huge flames during apartment building fire

Eric Haak photo

huge flames during apartment building fire

Eric Haak photo

Riverdale fire engine at fire scene

Eric Haak photo

elevated master streams battle fire

Eric Haak photo

Merrionette Park fire truck at fire scene

Eric Haak photo

Orland Fire District ladder truck at work

Eric Haak photo

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Merrionette Park Fire Department news

From the Merrionette Park Fire Department Facebook page:

“This morning Truck Company 2664 and Deputy Chief 2610 Richard C Musil
assisted the Robbins Fire Department with a residential structure fire.”

house fire in Robbins IL

From the Merrionette Park Fire Department Facebook page

From the Merrionette Park Fire Department Facebook page

aftermath of house fire

From the Merrionette Park Fire Department Facebook page

aftermath of house fire

From the Merrionette Park Fire Department Facebook page

fire truck at night fire scene

From the Merrionette Park Fire Department Facebook page

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Merrionette Park Fire Department news

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As seen around … Merrionette Park

From Dennis McGuire, Jr. 

Merrionette Park Fire Department fire truck

Dennis McGuire, Jr. photo

Merrionette Park Fire Department fire engine

Dennis McGuire, Jr. photo

Merrionette Park Fire Department fire engine

Dennis McGuire, Jr. photo

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Merrionette Park Fire Department (more)

Excerpts from the ChicagoTribune.com:

The Merrionette Park Fire Department is apparently in revolt after the village didn’t reappoint three senior department officials and a longtime department secretary at its board meeting last month.

At least a dozen members of the paid on-call department have resigned since Deputy Chief Pat Carter, Capt. Tom Ziolkowski, Lt. Jim Carter and secretary Katie Quinn Schneider had their posts rescinded.

Firefighter Tony Calzaretta said it’s generally a given that village employees, who are reappointed by the mayor on one-year contracts each spring, will be retained unless they’ve engaged in some sort of misconduct. In instances where the village does rescind someone’s employment, it typically provides an explanation. That, however, did not happen in this case, he said.

The moves coincided with the installation of Thomas J. Wendt as the new fire chief on Monday. Wendt, a part-time fire lieutenant in Calumet Park and the former chief of the Dixmoor Fire Department, replaced longtime Chief Leonard Edling, who retired at the end of April.

Considered an outsider by longtime members of the department, Wendt joined the Merrionette Park Fire Department a couple months ago, around the time Edling announced he would be stepping down.

While firefighters believed from the beginning that Wendt had the inside track to replace Edling and had not been opposed to his appointment, it was still shocking that three of the department’s senior officials were let go without explanation around the time he was installed.

Village spokesman Pete DiCianni said he could not comment on why the senior department members had not been retained because it was a personnel matter. He said the mayor chose Wendt as the new chief because of his vast amount of leadership experience and the fact that he lived in Merrionette Park.

In a statement released Tuesday, Mayor Dennis Magee said the village was thankful to outgoing members of our fire protection community for their service, but did not otherwise acknowledge the resignations. He characterized the fire department resignations as sour grapes and said that many of those who resigned did not regularly respond to calls anyway.

According to data provided by the village, eight of the 12 firefighters who resigned had responded to less than 10 percent of emergency incidents this year. Three had not responded to any and one responded to only 1 percent of calls.

To make up for the loss in manpower, Wendt said in a note to the mayor that he plans to present the names of seven new fire department applicants at the village board meeting in May. He also plans to restructure the department’s operations by staffing the firehouse with two members at all times to respond to minor incidents. Additional manpower can be summoned for larger incidents, as necessary.

Previously, the firehouse was unmanned, and firefighters responded to pages from dispatchers when emergency calls came in, a process Wendt called inefficient with the potential to prove costly, because dozens of firefighters might respond to a minor incident that did not require all of them.

Three years of budget documents show that Merrionette Park paid around $150,000 annually to its firefighters, not including a $40,500 salary for the chief.

thanks Dan

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