Chicago Fire Department Special Duty – Blind Shaft Elevator Rescue 7/23/16

This from Tim Olk:

On Sat July 23,2016, Chicago Fire Department Tower Ladder 10 was going to a high rise on north Halsted for a report of four girls stuck in an elevator. After trying to reset the elevator which failed, they requested a blind shaft response.
Companies were:
Batt 3
Tower 10
Squad 1
Squad 2
Special Operations Chief 515
and an ambulance
The car was stuck between floors 2&3.  Firefighters locked out the elevator and setup on the 5th floor with ropes and worked off Floor 4. After lowering afirefighter down the shaft, they found four girls who had been in there for two hours but were in good spirits. Firefighters broughtall four girls to the 4th floor by rope where they were evaluated by paramedics.

firefighters rescue trapped victims in an elevator

Tim Olk photo

firefighters rescue trapped victims in an elevator

Tim Olk photo

firefighters rescue trapped victims in an elevator

Tim Olk photo

firefighters rescue trapped victims in an elevator

Tim Olk photo

Chicago firefighters rescue woman trapped in elevator

Tim Olk photo

Chicago firefighters rescue woman trapped in elevator

Tim Olk photo

firefighters rescue trapped victims in an elevator

Tim Olk photo

Chicago firefighters rescue woman trapped in elevator

Tim Olk photo

firefighters rescue trapped victims in an elevator

Tim Olk photo

firefighters rescue trapped victims in an elevator

Tim Olk photo

firefighters rescue trapped victims in an elevator

Tim Olk photo

Share/Save

Tags: , ,

Foundation and Fire District supply Narcan kits to police

Excerpts from the ChicagoTribune.com:

The supply of Narcan kits police carry to help revive people who have overdosed on an opioid was dangerously low, according to the Lake County Health Department, but then a foundation and a fire protection district came to the rescue.

The new kits that are being bought are described by advocates as an easier-delivery nasal spray type that was fast-tracked by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“We could have been in dire straits if it wasn’t for the Filler Foundation of Highland Park and the Warren-Waukegan Fire Protection District,” said Susan McKnight, coordinator for the county’s substance-abuse program.

Phillip DeRuntz, a trustee with the fire district, said that at the last monthly meeting of the Lake County Opioid Initiative, he learned the health department was down to its last 50 kits. Then Susan Guggenheim of the Filler Foundation spoke and said officials were starting a matching grant program for kits up to $25,000.

McKnight said the new kits, which have two does per kit, is from a company called Adapt Pharmaceutical and do not have to be assembled like some pharmaceutical devices. It can also be used in just one nostril where others need half a dose in one nostril and half in another.

For the last two years, the health department has secured 3,000 kits a year for distribution among the 2,000 law-enforcement officers in Lake County from the Virginia-based Kaleo company. Because of a shortage this year, the department was only able to provide 1,000 kits, which were the injectable type.

Guggenheim said the Filler Foundation was created by Mark and Julie Filler of Highland Park, who lost their 23-year-old son when he got hooked on opioids after a sports injury. He was revived once at home by paramedics during his fight with the addiction and was sent to rehabilitation, but then a few weeks after he got home, he died of an overdose.

“This was an area we could make an immediate impact and save a life,” she said of the foundation’s gift of $40,000 and the matching grant challenge of up to $25,000. They matched the fire district’s $3,750 and have received more donations for the program, including a recent $1,000 contribution from Compass Health of Northbrook and $1,800 from the Vernon Hills Police Department.

She said they also now have a text-line donation source where individuals can contribute any amount by texting Hero23 to 41444.

Tags: , , , ,

Chicago 2-11 Alarm and Level I Haz Mat, 7-25-16

This from Eric Haak:

Here are some images from Chicago’s 2-11 Alarm on the southbound Stevenson Expressway east of Cicero Avenue.  The incident was apparently the result of a car rear-ending a semi carrying paint just before 11 o’clock Monday morning (7/25).   The best I could do was show the extensive in-line operation up the exit ramp to the crash site.  Engines pumping in order from the farthest hydrant were 99-32-38-15-127.  652 responded from Midway Airport but I was only able to get a picture of them as they flew up the off-ramp.
IL State Police close the highway for a truck fire

Eric Haak photo

Chicago FD Engine 99

Eric Haak photo

Chicago FD Engine 32

Eric Haak photo

in-line pumping operation in Chicago

Eric Haak photo

in-line pumping operation in Chicago

Eric Haak photo

in-line pumping operation in Chicago

Eric Haak photo

Chicago fire trucks stages on the highway

Eric Haak photo

Firefighters found a body in the burning wreckage of a crash on the Stevenson Expressway Monday morning that involved at least two semis, a van, and two cars, according to state police.

The accident happened around 10:55 a.m. on the outbound lanes of the expressway between Pulaski Road and Cicero Avenue.

The body was found hours later in the van after the extra-alarm fire had been extinguished.

One person was taken to a hospital and was reported stable, according to state police, who said the injuries were not considered life-threatening. Three other people declined medical attention, Langford said.

Langford said it appeared the accident was a chain reaction, but it was not clear which vehicle crashed first.  Fire crews used foam to put out the fire, which was spread about 120 feet across the interstate.

One semi was hauling more than 17,800 pounds of paint, which fueled the fire, and the other was carrying about 40,000 pounds of frozen meat.

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

New Engine for the LaSalle Fire Department

This from Bill Fricker:

Hello here’s a photo of the new Engine Co. 412 at La Salle, IL. It’s a 2016 Pierce Saber (28881TR-01)  1250-gpm / 1000-gbt / 25 gal foam   Vin: 4P1BAAFF2GAO16039  Waterous: 154539  Enjoy!
LaSalle Fire Department fire engine

Engine Co. 412 at La Salle, IL – 2016 Pierce Saber (28881TR-01) 1,250/1,000/25F Bill Fricker photo

Tags: , , ,

Chicago Haz Mat Level I, 7-24-16

This from Tim Olk:

Chicago Fire Department Level 1 Haz-Mat car vs semi with saddle tank diesel leak – Firefighters responded to West 103rd Street for a truck leaking diesel fuel in the sewers. Temps were 115 with the heat index.

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Chicago FD haz mat techs clean diesel fuel spill from ruptured saddle tank

Tim Olk photo

Tags: , , , ,

Oak Lawn Fire Department news

Excerpts from the ChicagoTribune.com:

Interest arbitration proceedings between the village of Oak Lawn and its firefighters union concluded this week, setting the stage for an independent arbitrator to rule on the parties’ longstanding collective bargaining dispute over minimum staffing levels.

Millions of taxpayer dollars hang on the arbitrator’s decision, which isn’t expected until November, but became a heated topic of debate among village trustees after one penned a rebuke of the mayor’s decision to continue her costly legal campaign against Oak Lawn’s Fire Department.

At issue currently is the village’s contention that it should be able to set minimum staffing levels at 19 firefighters per shift, down two from the 21-per-shift staffing minimum that an independent arbitrator in 2008 ruled the village must abide by, Oak Lawn officials said.

The dispute dates back to 2008, when the firefighters union filed a grievance against Oak Lawn after the village, as a belt-tightening measure, began staffing engines with three people, rather than four, as is stipulated in the contract.

A grievance arbitrator sided with the union and ordered the village to maintain a minimum manning level of 21 people per shift and provide $286,000 in back pay for the nine-plus months the village had reduced staffing below that number, village officials said.

As a result, the village returned minimum staffing to 21 per shift and, after losing an appeal of the arbitrator’s decision, paid out the allotted sum.

The union later filed a compliance petition, arguing that the village had not complied with the minimum staffing provisions in the contract. The Illinois Labor Relations Board initially found in favor of the union and last year awarded them more than $3 million in back pay and accrued interest, but that decision was later reversed on appeal.

Oak Lawn has argued separately, and thus far unsuccessfully, that minimum staffing levels at the fire department should be a management prerogative that is not subject to collective bargaining. As a result, both sides have repeatedly come to loggerheads when negotiating labor contracts in recent years.

“It’s our contention that that is an inherent right in Illinois and that the decision on how to staff and what level to staff and how to deploy is a right of management, the governing body,” said village manager Larry Deetjen, who along with Fire Chief George Sheets, Mayor Sandra Bury and all but one member of the board, argue that the fire department can operate safely and effectively with fewer members working per shift and in so doing, save the village a significant amount in overtime costs.

The collective bargaining dispute first went to an interest arbitrator in 2014, who decided to leave staffing stipulations contained in the contract as is. When that contract expired at the end of 2014, the village brought the issue back to arbitration, where a new arbitrator will rule on it in the coming months.

In an editorial printed last month in multiple local publications, Trustee Bob Streit, the board’s lone consistent opposition voice, questioned Bury’s decision to continue expending taxpayer funds in the village’s years-long legal battle with the fire department over minimum staffing, while simultaneously supporting the recent settlement of a lawsuit filed by a former village employee to save taxpayers money by avoiding the expense of prolonged litigation.

“For more than three years you and the village manager instructed village attorneys to disregard court rulings and pursue … this legal battle with no concern for taxpayers in this instance,” wrote Streit, claiming that the village had spent more than $1 million in legal fees on the case.

“Actions speak louder than words, Mayor Bury, and your actions clearly communicate that you’re one of those politicians who say one thing and do another,” the letter continues. “You have completely ‘un-friended’ the taxpayers of Oak Lawn, and you owe each of us an explanation.”

Bury, who Wednesday issued a unified letter from the rest of the board in response to Streit’s allegations, said her explanation for fighting the litigation was simple. The economic stakes are simply too high not to continue the village’s legal fight with the fire department.

She said the $1 million figure Streit cited for legal fees expended was incorrect, and asserted the village actually had spent a combined $514,769 on all fire department legal matters since she took office in May 2013.

That taxpayer money, Bury said, had been put to good use.

She credits the village’s willingness to fight a 2015 Illinois Labor Relations Board ruling for saving Oak Lawn millions of dollars.

The board’s initial ruling, which ordered the village to pay firefighters $3.2 million for years of back pay and accrued interest, was reversed on appeal last summer. The firefighters union is now appealing that reversal before the Illinois Appellate Court.

Oak Lawn officials said the village stands to save an additional $937,000 in overtime costs annually going forward if it prevails in its current arbitration with the department over minimum staffing requirements.

She accused Streit, who initially supported fighting the firefighters union on the staffing issue, of playing politics.

Streit defended his $1 million figure, stating that the legal fees came up during finance committee meetings held during the budget process last year.

Streit acknowledged that while the most recent court rulings have favored the village, he expects those will be reversed on appeal, and that Oak Lawn will be on the hook for the more than $3 million that Bury asserts she’s saved taxpayers.

He said he initially went along with Deetjen’s recommendation to defend the village against the union’s grievance, but changed his mind after multiple legal setbacks.

“I respect the opinion of the court,” said Streit, who also said he believes the village should long ago have worked out a negotiated settlement with the union rather than fight a protracted legal battle. “When the court ruled in favor of the firefighters, it was time to stop fighting, for sure.”

Rather than reduce staffing levels, Streit contends that the village needs to hire more firefighters and called the 30 percent reduction in fire department personnel over the last 20 years “an assault on public safety.”

Village officials responded that hiring additional firefighters was neither necessary from a safety standpoint nor fiscally responsible.

According to an analysis performed by Oak Lawn’s finance director, the gross lifetime cost of hiring a firefighter at age 22 who goes on to work for 30 years, retires and lives another 30 years post-retirement is approximately $7.5 million. For that reason, it’s actually more cost-effective to pay firefighters nearly $3 million in overtime annually than hire more workers, officials said.

Bury, in her rebuttal to Streit, wrote that she just wants Oak Lawn’s fire department minimum staffing levels to align with those of the communities where the majority of its firefighters live.

“This Administration’s position is simple,” she wrote. “If it is safe and effective for those fire departments, then it can be safe and effective for Oak Lawn.”

thanks Dan

Tags: , , ,

Bloomingdale Fire District news

Excerpts from the DailyHerald.com:

In Bloomingdale, firefighters had to use an adult oxygen mask [on a dog] that was not designed for pets, which adds to the animal’s stress and leaves the owner frantic.

The Bloomingdale Fire Protection District [recently] welcomed a donation of masks specifically meant to fit around a snout and administer oxygen to a pet struggling to breath.

Invisible Fence of Chicagoland donated two kits that the district will keep on apparatus at its two stations. With the help of a veterinarian, firefighters were trained how to use the mask on a dog.

Through a program called Project Breathe, the company has provided more than 10,000 kits to fire stations across the country and Canada. Earlier this month, Wheaton firefighters received the devices.

Fire departments can complete forms seeking the kits at Invisiblefence.com/O2.

Tags: , ,

Working fire in Chicago, 7-23-16

Found on YouTube:

CHICAGO HOUSE FIRE CAPTURED W/ DJI PHANTOM 4 DRONE 7.23.16. NO INJURIES AND NO ONE WAS HURT.

thanks Dan

Tags: , , ,

New Ambulance in Maywood

This from Josh Boyajian:

New ambulance in Maywood, A500 2014 Ford E-450/Wheeled Coach Type III

Maywood FD Ambulance 500

Maywood Ambulance 500 – 2014 Ford E450/Wheeled Coach Type III. Josh Boyajian photo

Tags: , , , ,

State mandated consolidation of 911 dispatch centers

Excerpts from the ChicagoTribune.com:

In the wake of recent news that 911 dispatchers in the villages of Harwood Heights, Norridge, and Schiller Park will face imminent layoffs as the towns prepare to consolidate their emergency call centers, one community is taking action to stop dispatchers from leaving their jobs. The approximately 35 dispatchers who now work in all three towns combined will be whittled to 18 to 20 dispatchers who will work in the new call center. The consolidated center is expected to open sometime next year, and all employees will have to reapply for their jobs if they wish to stay.

Three dispatchers at Norridge’s 911 call center have quit since the state-mandated consolidation was announced in March, according to Norridge Police Chief Dave Disselhorst. That prompted Norridge officials on July 13 to support a measure to offer retention bonuses to the village’s remaining 11 dispatchers. The potential bonus amount has not yet been determined.

The Harwood Heights Police Department was chosen in June by a consulting firm hired in March to conduct a feasibility study to help the towns decide where a new consolidated emergency dispatch center should go. The state’s amended Emergency Telephone Safety Act, signed into law a year ago, required all consolidation plans to be submitted by this month, and the new facilities will open by July of next year.

The law requires small towns in Cook County to merge their 911 dispatch operations with other nearby towns by reopening one joint 911 communication center to serve more than one town.

None from Harwood Heights’ team of eight dispatchers have quit since the consolidation was announced, according to Police Chief Frank Biagi, who said he was pleased Harwood Heights was recommended as the location for the new center.

“At this point, it was only recommended by our consultant that the Harwood Heights communications room would be the best place for the new dispatch center, so no final decisions have been made yet,” Biagi said. “We are very excited about being chosen as the host location, but this still needs to be discussed and approved by all of the village officials in Harwood Heights, Norridge and Schiller Park.”

Schiller Park Fire Chief Pete Chiodo wasn’t available for comment, and it was unclear whether any of the 10 dispatchers who work for the community had quit since the consolidation was announced.

 

Tags: , , ,