Posts Tagged Prospect Heights Fire Protection District

Wheeling/Prospect Heights Fire Department news (more)

This from Dan McInerney:

1967 Cessna 310N with unlocked front landing gear 
Prospect Heights and Wheeling Fire Departments
 
The aircraft with 2 souls on board circled for approximately 90 minutes to burn off excess fuel before landing. The pilot did an excellent job bringing it in with no injuries and minor damage to the airframe.
Cessna 310 landing with unlocked front nose gear

Dan McInerney photo

Prospect Heights FPD and Wheeling FD units standby at Chicago Executive Airport

Dan McInerney photo

Prospect Heights FPD and Wheeling FD units standby at Chicago Executive Airport

Dan McInerney photo

Cessna 310 landing with unlocked front nose gear

Dan McInerney photo

Cessna 310 landing with unlocked front nose gear

Dan McInerney photo

Cessna 310 landing with unlocked front nose gear

Dan McInerney photo

Cessna 310 landing with unlocked front nose gear

Dan McInerney photo

Cessna 310 landing with unlocked front nose gear

Dan McInerney photo

Cessna 310 landing with unlocked front nose gear

Dan McInerney photo

Dan McInerney photo

Dan McInerney photo

Cessna 310 after landing with unlocked front nose gear

Dan McInerney photo

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Wheeling/Prospect Heights Fire Department news (more)

Cessna 310 with nose gear failure

Prospect Heights FPD photo

From the Prospect Heights FPD:

Call came in at 12:15 p.m.

Report was an aircraft having with trouble landing gear on nose of plane. For this, we send a Stand By assignment. The vehicles and personnel report to pre-assigned locations at the airport and wait for further information from the Air Traffic Control Tower. A standby occurs when the pilot believes there may be an emergency once a landing is attempted such as in this case of having to eventually land but perhaps with the landing gear not working as intended.

Aircraft was a Cessna 310 twin-prop with two persons onboard, pilot and passenger.

Aircraft remained in flight for more than one hour using up fuel.

While the incident began at 12:15, the aircraft did not land until almost 2:00 p.m. This was a safety precaution (to use up the fuel and ensure conditions were best possible).

Initial response was:

·       Two specialized Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) vehicles, one from Prospect Heights and one from Wheeling

·       Two battalion chiefs, one from Prospect Heights and one from Wheeling

·       One ambulance

·       One engine

Once it was determined that in fact there were two persons on board and that the landing would be made without confidence in the landing gear, one additional ambulance and one tanker were requested. Both PHFPD and Wheeling fire chiefs and deputy chiefs also responded.

Due to the anticipated length of the incident, off-duty Prospect Heights and Wheeling firefighters were paged to come in and fill in their respective stations until the on-duty personnel cleared the airport.

The plane landed on runway 12/30 and came to a full stop on the runway with the nose of the aircraft unsupported as shown in the attached photo.

Neither the pilot or passenger were transported to a hospital for care.

The airport is jointly owned by the City of Prospect Heights and the Village of Wheeling. Both fire departments operate a joint response with unified command for any aircraft incident. Unlike homes or businesses, there are not streets that easily define the municipal boundaries. Many times an aircraft incident may begin in one municipality and travel into the other. For more than 20 years this joint response has worked well and produced positive results.

Prospect Heights FPD ARFF unit

Prospect Heights FPD photo

Prospect Heights FPD ARFF unit and tender 9

Prospect Heights FPD photo

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Wheeling/Prospect Heights Fire Department news

Wheeling and Prospect Heights units spent several hours this afternoon (12/5/18) at the Chicago Executive Airport as a small plane with front landing gear issues circled the area to burn off fuel before landing. When the plane was allowed to land, the pilot brought the plane in as the front gear collapsed. There was no fire, no injuries, and minimal damage to the plane.

private plane after landing without front nose gear

Scott Lasker photo

 

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Prospect Heights Fire District news

From the Prospect Heights Fire District:

We are recruiting for our POC program. POCs attend the NIPSTA Fire Academy and transition quickly to part time employees. This is an excellent opportunity for those who can commit to the fire academy schedule and want to begin a fire service career. The residency requirement is flexible and used as one tool in selecting applicants. Typically, each year three applicants are selected for this program.

APPLICATION PERIOD IS CURRENTLY OPEN UNTIL OCTOBER 19, 2018

CAREFULLY REVIEW ALL INFORMATION PRIOR TO SUBMITTING APPLICATION

Information and link to application herehttp://www.phfire.com/content/paidoncall/

General Requirements for Paid-On Call Membership

In order to be considered for Paid-On-Call (POC) membership (employment) with the Prospect Heights Fire Protection District (PHFPD), the following minimum requirements must be met.  The requirements include, but are not limited to:

In order to be considered for Paid-On-Call (POC) membership (employment) with the Prospect Heights Fire Protection District (PHFPD), the following minimum requirements must be met.  The requirements include, but are not limited to:

  1. Be at least 18 years of age.
  2. Reside within approximately ten (10) miles of the fire station.  More importantly, meet performance requirements of fire district. Persons living more than ten (10) miles will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.  
  3. Be in good physical condition and mental health and able to perform strenuous manual labor.
  4. Be of good moral character and not had any serious criminal activity history as determined by a background investigation conducted by the PHFPD using fingerprint submission to the Illinois State Police and FBI and request for Drivers License Abstract from the Secretary of State.
  5. Possess a valid class D Driver’s License issued by the state in which the applicant resides. 
  6. Be a High School graduate or possess a GED certificate.
  7. Be an U.S. citizen or possess work authorization from the U.S. Department of Immigration and Naturalization.
  8. Possess a valid and current EMT-B or paramedic license from the IDPH.
  9. Possess proof of completion within the 12 months prior to application of the Candidate Physical Ability Test – CPAT.NOTE: You must present a valid CPAT with ladder climb card or certificate with your submitted application AND again at time of job offer, present a valid CPAT card or certificate. Valid means not more than 12 months old.
  1. Upon acceptance pass a psychological evaluation, physical examination, and drug screen.

Complete position descriptions as well as hiring policies and procedures of the PHFPD are available upon written request to the Fire Chief.

 

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5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18 (more)

Press Release River Trails Condos Fire-1 Press Release River Trails Condos Fire Press Release River Trails Condos Fire

click on any of the pages for a larger, downloadable file

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5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18 (more)

second part of the video from Larry Shapiro of the 5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18

 

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5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18 (more)

Larry Shapiro video (part 1) 

 

More photos from the 5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18 

Tim Olk photo

Picture 1 of 14

Massive fire destroys 3 apartment buildings on McIntosh Court in Prospect Heights, IL 7/18/18. Tim Olk photo

Excerpts from the DailyHerald.com:

When firefighters responded to a fire at one of the 16 buildings that make up the River Trails Condominium complex in Prospect Heights Wednesday afternoon, they knew the blaze could quickly get out of hand.

Investigators said a juvenile accidentally ignited the blaze. No charges have been filed. The blaze started in a second-floor unit in the southernmost building on McIntosh Court and rapidly spread upward and outward. Once it reached the attic, the blaze had unfettered access to the other three buildings. The mansard-style roof that hangs over the third floor also allowed the fire to glide effortlessly along the structure’s side as the flames fed on air inside the enclosed eaves. A mild breeze then helped stoke the flames.

Firefighters made every attempt to stop or slow the spread of flames, but they were thwarted by the fire’s ability to keep moving until it got to the northernmost building. There, they made a successful stand against the encroaching flames.

“We tried to cut in several spots before that to try and stop it,” Prospect Heights Fire District Chief Drew Smith said. “It was a futile effort. If this would have happened at 1 a.m. instead of 1 p.m. like it did, I don’t know how this would have turned out.”

Fire safety officials blame the speed and scope on a lack of modern fire safety devices and construction. The 46-year-old complex had no building-wide fire alarms, sprinkler systems, fire walls or attic separators — all fire safety features that experts say would have stopped or significantly slowed the inferno.

New apartments are required to have sprinkler systems, firewalls to keep fires from spreading to other units, and attic separators that restrict overhead air flow in the building to lower the risk of fires spreading. None of the buildings that burned Wednesday had those, and none had building-wide fire alarms. Because of their age, the Prospect Heights buildings were not required to have those fire safety measures in place.

And under current city code, if the apartments are rebuilt, they still might not have them. If more than 50 percent of the buildings that burned are salvageable, the city can’t force the owners to retrofit the buildings to comply with modern fire codes.

Prospect Heights Fire District Chief Drew Smith warns against rebuilding the apartments as if nothing happened. “We are going to meet with the city and try to put forth a strategy for what comes next,” he said. “We need them to have a fire alarm in these buildings, at the very least.”

On Christmas Eve morning 2006, a blaze caused by Christmas lights in a second-floor unit had the entire third floor engulfed in 10 minutes. That fire also spread to a neighboring building, though firefighters were able to quickly extinguish it. In the end, only 30 percent of the building was destroyed and it was reconstructed without a sprinkler system or other modern fire suppression measures.

Estimates indicate retrofitting existing buildings with sprinklers costs between $2 and $7 per square foot, according to the National Fire Protection Association. The 16 buildings at River Trails contain roughly 380,000 square feet of living space, putting the estimated cost at somewhere between $760,000 and $2.7 million. That the cost would require a special assessment that would possibly be passed on to renters, who might then be priced out of their homes. Most of the River Trails units are individually owned and rented out to others. 

Several towns require sprinklers in new construction of single-family homes.

thanks Dan

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5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18 (more)

This from Steve Redick:

This last Wednesday I attended the major fire in a condo complex that destroyed 3 full buildings and part of a 4th in Prospect Heights. 96 Units were damaged or destroyed leaving many homeless. The fire began in a second floor unit in a very remote section of the complex and penetrated the mansard style roof and cockloft/ attic space. Tremendous efforts were made in the form of multiple trench cuts and opening the mansard in several places as well as a great deal of interior operations. In the end several master streams were also utilized. It has been said this is the largest MABAS response in the area since the Arlington Park Racetrack fire many years ago. Enclosed are a few images from the 4 hours I was there observing. All the images can be seen here on my website.
 
I am also enclosing an aerial view of the complex.
Steve
heavy fire along mansard roof

Steve Redick photo

Firefighter vents mansard roof

Steve Redick photo

heavy smoke from building fire

Steve Redick photo

heavy smoke from building fire

Steve Redick photo

Firefighters climb aerial ladder at building fire

Steve Redick photo

Firefighters climb aerial ladder at building fire

Steve Redick photo

Steve Redick photo

heavy smoke from building fire

Steve Redick photo

heavy smoke from building fire

Steve Redick photo

heavy smoke from building fire

Steve Redick photo

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5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18 (more)

This from Nick Neziri:

A few photos I took of the Prospect Heights 5th Alarm on 07/18/2018.

-Nick Neziri

apartment building destroyed by fire

Nick Neziri photo

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5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18 (more)

more photos from the 5-Alarm fire with 2 Specials and a 2-Alarm EMS Box in Prospect Heights, 7-18-18 

Buffalo Grove Quint 27 at a fire

Chi-Town Fire Photos

Arlington Heights FD Engine 4 at a fire

Chi-Town Fire Photos

Glenview FD Truck 14 working at a fire

Chi-Town Fire Photos

Prospect Heights FPD fire trucks at fire scene

Chi-Town Fire Photos

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