Posts Tagged Chicago Fire Department

Chicago 3-11 Alarm fire 4-29-13

This from the Chicago Tribune:

Chicago firefighters battled a smoky extra-alarm fire in a large abandoned one-story factory building in the Park Manor neighborhood this afternoon.

The 3-11 alarm fire was declared under control at 1:15 p.m., said Chicago Fire Department Chief Kevin MacGregor.

Crews were called to the building at 6800 South Cottage Grove Avenue about 12:14 p.m. A 3-11 alarm was called at the abandoned 200-foot-by-200-foot one-story building about 12:40 p.m.

This from CFD media:

3-11 Alarm Fire in Chicago

CFD Media photo

3-11 Alarm Fire in Chicago

CFD Media photo

3-11 Alarm Fire in Chicago

CFD Media photo

3-11 Alarm Fire in Chicago

CFD Media photo

3-11 Alarm Fire in Chicago

CFD Media photo

3-11 Alarm Fire in Chicago

CFD Media photo

3-11 Alarm Fire in Chicago

CFD Media photo

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Building fire in Chicago 4-21-13 (pt 2)

More on this morning’s fire on S. Michigan from Dan Shevlin:

113th & Michigan
Still Time : 0918
Battalion 22 & the group had a fire in Roseland today . 2-story ordinary 25 x 50 . BC22 reported heavy fire on the 2nd floor & fire in the cockloft . I arrived when the fire was under control . Thanks Dan Shevlin
Chicago fire engine at fire scene

Dan Shevlin photo

fireman standing on roof

Dan Shevlin photo

two firemen on ladder

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago fireman at fire scene

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago fireman at fire scene

Dan Shevlin photo

firefighter working after fire

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago fire engine at fire scene

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago building fire 4-21-13

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago building fire 4-21-13

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago fire engine at fire scene

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago fire trucks at fire scene

Dan Shevlin photo

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Building fire in Chicago 4-21-13

This from Erik Haak:

At 0920 hrs, Sunday morning, Engine 62 reported a working fire at 11259 S. Michigan Avenue.  Battalion 22 reported fire in the basement which eventually made it up through the second floor and into the cockloft of the 2-story apartment over commercial structure.  Truck 62 was RIT.  All photos credited to Eric Haak.

 

Chicago FD engine pumping at fire scene

Engine 62 had lines off. Erik Haak photo

Chicago FD engine pumping at fire scene

Engine 75 had a hydrant. Erik Haak photo

Chicago FD Crimson aerial

CFD Truck 62 was parked down the block. Erik Haak photo

Chicago firefighters on the roof with smoke

Firefighters vent the roof. Erik Haak photo

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What’s new … CFD

This from Dennis McGuire, Jr;

Spotted this at the Fabrication shop at 1344 W. 43rd. St.

 

new Chicago FD chassis

New chassis for unknown CFD unit at the city fabrication shops. Dennis McGuire, Jr. photo

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Historic CFD radio traffic: 3-11 Alarm Century Lumber 6-6-78

This from Steve Redick; Century Lumber fire at Diversey and Clybourn, June 6, 1978 went to a 3-11:

Here’s a real blast from the past. I recorded this using a plain old cassette recorder and microphone held up to the scanner speaker while I was living at my grandparent’s house. It has held up pretty well over the years. I recognize Art Benker on the main radio at the start of the fire, and the Division Marshal was Joe Brichetto, my dad’s boss when he was in the 10th battalion. You can hear the water task force and the fireboat as well as some talk about Big John and Little John … ahhh those were the days …

Steve

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Chicago Still Alarm fire 4-13-13

This from Dan Shevlin:

Address: 4123 W Monroe
Still Time : 1347 hours
Battalion 13 & the group had a small kitchen fire 4/13/13, Engine 95 had a line off & the fire was extinguished quickly.
Thanks Dan Shevlin
Chicago FD Engine 38

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago FD Truck 26

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago FD Truck 26

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago FD Engine 95

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago FD Engine 95

Dan Shevlin photo

Chicago FD Engine 95

Dan Shevlin photo

firefighter with air pack

Dan Shevlin photo

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CFD Still & Box Alarm fire with mayday injures four firefighters

A fire this morning at 9401 Muskegan on Chicago’s southside began as a basement fire that travelled up two floors, eventually compromising an upper stairway which collapsed injuring four Chicago firefighters.

4 Chicago firefighters injured at fire

Four Chicago firefighters were injured when an upper stairway collapsed at this building at 9401 S. Muskegan. Tim Olk photo

4 Chicago firefighters injured at fire

Fire extended from the ground floor unit to the upper floors in this building where four Chicago firefighters were injured this morning. Tim Olk photo

From CFDMedia Operations:

4 Chicago firefighters injured at fire

CFD Media Twitter

 

This from the Chicago Tribune:

Four Chicago firefighters were injured after a stairway collapsed while they were fighting a fire in a 3-story apartment building on the South Side in which officials had to call for an emergency response, officials said.

The fire was on the 9000 block of South Muskegan Avenue and reported at 8:43 a.m., according to Chicago fire department officials. About 200 firefighters responded, said Deputy Dist. Chief Lynda Turner.

The four firefighters sustained injures when they were on a stairwell connecting the second and third floors, said Turner.

None of the firefighters sustained broken bones, said Fire Department Comdr. Sean Flynn. At least two of the firefighters sustained minor smoke inhalation, said Flynn.

The “Mayday” response was called at about 9 a.m., said Turner.

Two of the firefighters sustained smoke inhalation and two firefighters minor injuries, according to Fire Department and police officials. All were in good condition and taken to Trinity Hospital, according to a fire department spokesman.

 

 

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Chicago FD Turret Wagon History (pt 17)

Another installment on the history of turret wagons in the Chicago Fire Department from Jack Connors. Images depict the 1976 Mack MB turret wagon that was assigned as 6-7-5 and 6-7-1.

Chicago FD Turret Wagon 671

Lettered for 6-7-1 at a Chicago FD Muster and Flea Market. Jack Connort photo

Chicago FD Turret Wagon 671

Photographed in May of 1986 by Engine 42’s house on Illinois Avenue as 6-7-1. Jack Connors photo

Chicago FD Turret Wagon 675

Another photo from July of 1977 as 6-7-5 sits on Illinois Avenue across from Engine 42’s house. Jack Connor photo

Chicago FD Turret Wagon 675

Photographed in July of 1977 at a community event held near 56th & Kedzie, Talman Federal Bank. Jack Connors

 

The previous post was HERE.

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Vacant CFD firehouses for sale

This from:

Fire Sale: Vacant Firehouses on the Market Around City

April 12, 2013 7:29am | By Benjamin Woodard, DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

ROGERS PARK — Across the city, 11 vacant firehouses are set to be sold off by the city, officials said.

Two of the old stations are on the Far North Side, one at 5714 N. Ridge Blvd. in Edgewater and another at 1723 W. Greenleaf Ave. in Rogers Park.

“The city has a variety of police and fire stations that are no longer serving public safety purposes and are available for redevelopment,” said Peter Strazzabosco, a deputy commissioner with the Department of Housing and Economic Development.

Strazzabosco said the zoning of each property varies, but any viable development proposal could be accepted by the city, including a restaurant or an office for a nonprofit organization.

“I will say, though, there’s lots of interest in the city’s vacant police and fire stations,” he said. “They have a lot of potential.”

Ald. Joe Moore (49th) said in an email to constituents that he had been working with Mayor Rahm Emanuel to find a use for the Greenleaf Avenue firehouse “that would be most beneficial to the surrounding neighborhood.”

Strazzabosco said there was “considerable interest” in the firehouse, which has been vacant since 2009 when the firefighters there moved to a new station on Clark Street.

The city appraised the structure and land at $250,000. Moore said the land is zoned for residential use, but he would consider supporting a zoning change for a project supported by the community.

At one time, the Rogers Park/West Ridge Historical Society expressed interest in moving into the firehouse, but decided it would not be able to afford to rehabilitate the building.

The deadline for bids is 4 p.m. May 8.

The firehouse on Ridge Boulevard, a Chicago Landmark, was built in 1928 and trimmed in terra cotta. The land and structure, including a parking lot, had been appraised at $350,000 and is zoned for a small-scale retail development.

Strazzabosco said the city would begin accepting bids for that property next week.

Any sale of city property, however, must be approved by the City Council.

In Bronzeville, the City Council is close to approving a $1, 10-year lease for a vacant firehouse to be used as a museum dedicated to African-American firefighters.

Other firehouses have been sold, such as one near the Damen Brown Line “L” stop, which is now being converted into a single-family home, Strazzabosco said.

Several south side firehouses, along with other historic buildings, are listed on the city’s website.

Moore said his zoning and land use advisory committee would review proposals for the Greenleaf Avenue firehouse.

“I look forward to sharing with you the proposals for the use of the site,” he told constituents.

thanks Dan

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National study discusses personnel for high-rise fires

This from Bill Post:

Yesterday the National Institute of Standards and Technology released a high rise fire fighting  study at the Metropolitan Fire Chiefs conference meeting in Phoenix Arizona. The Chicago Fire Fighters Union Local 2 has already cited it in an effort at negotiations with the city as to why the Chicago Fire Department can’t afford to cut crew size.

The Chicago Fire Department’s union chief on Wednesday brandished a new federal report on fighting high-rise fires to push back against potential job cuts as part of protracted labor negotiations with Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration.

The study by the U.S. Commerce Department, the national firefighters union and other organizations focused on response times to blazes in 13-story buildings and found that crews of five or six firefighters put out fires and conducted search-and-rescue operations “significantly faster” than three-person or four-person teams.

The Fire Department contract that lapsed in June requires five firefighters per truck, but Emanuel has left open the possibility of reducing staffing levels. There has been little progress in negotiations since then, but firefighters must work under the old rules for now.

While most of Chicago’s high-rises are concentrated downtown and along the lakefront, Firefighters Union Local 2 President Thomas Ryan argued that other large buildings like schools and factories are found throughout the city and present many of the same challenges. He argued that the report “scientifically proves what we’ve been saying for years” and said cutting the number of firefighters at any firehouse in the city would put the public at risk.

Administration spokesman Bill McCaffrey said high-rise fires are relatively infrequent, so the report represents “a very small portion of properties and fires in the city.”

“And Chicago has highly skilled and well-equipped high-rise response teams, a recently rewritten high-rise response protocol and strict requirements for fire safety in high-rises — these are the most critical factors in maintaining safety in high-rises in Chicago,” McCaffrey said in an email.

Information about the study can be found HERE. Excerpts from the press release:

Landmark High-Rise Fire Study Evaluates Effectiveness of Crew Sizes, Elevator Use

PHOENIX – When responding to fires in high-rise buildings, firefighting crews of five or six members—instead of three or four—are significantly faster in putting out fires and completing search-and-rescue operations, concludes a major new study* carried out by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in cooperation with five other organizations.

Results of the study, carried out with 13 Washington, D.C.-area fire departments, were presented today at the 2013 Metropolitan Fire Chiefs Conference in Phoenix.

“Unlike most house fires, high-rise fires are high-hazard situations that pose unique operational challenges to fire service response. How big a fire gets and how much danger it poses to occupants and firefighters are largely determined by crew size and how personnel are deployed at the scene,” says lead researcher Jason Averill, a NIST fire protection engineer. “It’s not simply that larger crews have more people. Larger crews are deployed differently and, as a result, are able to perform required tasks more quickly.”

An analysis of 14 “critical tasks”—those undertaken when potential risks to building occupants and firefighters are greatest—found that three-member crews took almost 12 minutes longer than crews of four, 21 minutes longer than crews of five, and 23 minutes longer than crews of six to complete all tasks. Four-person crews took nine minutes and 11 minutes longer than five- and six-member crews, respectively.

The study also looked at the effect of using fire service access elevators to move firefighters and equipment up to the staging floor and concluded that most tasks were started two to four minutes faster when using the elevators compared with using the stairs.

On the basis of the results of computer modeling, which incorporate data from live experimental burns, the study team concluded that smaller crews end up facing larger fires because of the additional time required to complete tasks.

A three-person crew, for example, would battle a medium-growing blaze that is almost 60 percent larger than the fire faced by a six-member crew, which would start extinguishing a fire roughly three-and-one-half minutes earlier. In an office building, this difference is equivalent to four employee cubicles on fire for a three-person crew versus two cubicles for a six-person crew.

Comparing the performances of different-sized crews, the researchers found that adding two members to three- and four-person teams would result in the largest improvements in starting and completing critical tasks, such as advancing the water hose to the fire location and beginning search and rescue. Improvements ranged from one minute to 25 minutes, depending on the task.

The research team also evaluated whether dispatching more three or four-member crews to a high rise fire—accomplished by sounding a higher initial alarm—would be as effective as sending a low first alarm contingent of engines and trucks staffed by more firefighters. They found that a “low-alarm response with crews of size four or five outperforms a high-alarm response with crew sizes smaller by one firefighter.”

“Prior to this experiment, some fire departments attempted to deploy with smaller crews on each piece of apparatus,” explains Lori Moore-Merrell of the International Association of Fire Fighters, a co-principal investigator for the study. “The logic suggested that, if the fire is big enough, just send more units, but it ignores the fact that larger crews have tactical advantages that reduce risk exposure to people and firefighters. Crews of six and even five can carry out crucial tasks in parallel rather than in series. Saving time can save occupant lives and prevent firefighter injuries and property damage.”

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) defines high-rises as buildings that are seven stories or taller, the height that exceeds most types of fire service ladders. In most U.S. communities, new high- rises are required to have automated sprinkler systems, which are designed to control the spread of fires, not to extinguish them.

But according to the NFPA, 41 percent of U.S. high-rise office buildings, 45 percent of high-rise hotels, and 54 percent of high-rise apartment buildings are not equipped with sprinklers, as compared with 25 percent of hospitals and related facilities. Moreover, sprinkler systems fail in about one in 14 fires.

While much less frequent than house fires, about 43 high-rise fires occur in the United States every day. Between 2005 and 2009, according to the NFPA, high-rise structure fires averaged 15,700 annually. Average annual losses totaled 53 civilian deaths, 546 civilian injuries and $235 million in property damage.

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