Posts Tagged Chicago Fire Department

Chicago Still Alarm 7-8-12

This from Eric Haak:

At 1320 hrs on Sunday afternoon, the 22nd Battalion responded with Engines 120 and 115 as well as Trucks 24 and 27 to 1240 West 111th place.  On arrival they found this 25 x 40, 2-story ordinary/occupied with a fire in the rear of the second floor.  A quick knock was made and the fire was contained within 10 minutes.  One firefighter was transported from the scene to Metro South Medical Center for observation.  Truck 40 was RIT with the 21st Battalion.

building fire in Chicago on West 111th Street July 8, 2012

Eric Haak photo

building fire in Chicago on West 111th Street July 8, 2012

Eric Haak photo

building fire in Chicago on West 111th Street July 8, 2012

Eric Haak photo

building fire in Chicago on West 111th Street July 8, 2012

Eric Haak photo

building fire in Chicago on West 111th Street July 8, 2012

Eric Haak photo

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Chicago 2-11 Alarm Fire 7-8-12

This from Eric Haak about this morning’s 2-11 in the city:

Just before 04:43 hrs, Chicago Fire Department Engine 47 and Truck 30 pulled up to find fire showing from the first floor of a 3-story, 75×100, mixed occupancy building at 6427 S. Cottage Grove.  Within two minutes, Battalion 17 called for the Still & Box and reported that the stairs leading to the upper floors had been compromised.  Access to the second and third floors had to be made via ground ladders.  At 04:50 hrs, Battalion 17 called for the 2-11 as fire vented from the roof and jeopardized the rear porches.  Things were brought under control relatively quickly after that and the 2-11 Alarm was struck at 05:18.

Chicago Fire Department apartment building 2-11 alarm fire 6427 S. Cottage Grove 7-8-12

Engine 63 in front of the fire building. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department apartment building 2-11 alarm fire 6427 S. Cottage Grove 7-8-12

Truck 30 and Truck 16 with their aerials to the roof. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department apartment building 2-11 alarm fire 6427 S. Cottage Grove 7-8-12

The interior stairs were compromised, so access to the upper floors was via ground ladders. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department apartment building 2-11 alarm fire 6427 S. Cottage Grove 7-8-12

Engine 47 was the first engine on the scene. Eric Haak photo

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CFD Apparatus History – trucks with boosters 1968

As a follow-up to the recent article about the 1968 Mack CF/Pirsch 100-foot aerials with booster tanks, Bill Freidrich submitted these replications of Pirsch literature featuring a Chicago unit.

Vintage brochure from Peter Pirsch & Sons Company featuring a Chicago ladder truck

Vintage brochure from Peter Pirsch & Sons Company featuring a Chicago ladder truck. Bill Friedrich collection

Vintage brochure from Peter Pirsch & Sons Company featuring a Chicago ladder truck

Another page of the brochure showing the aerial raised and the jacks deployed. Bill Friedrich collection

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CFD Apparatus History – trucks with boosters 1968

The Chicago Fire Department purchased aerial ladder trucks with booster tanks and pumps for several years. Beginning in 1966 and spanning through 1973, 31 aerials were delivered from different manufacturers with on-board water. Seven of these were mid-ship aerials and the balance were rear-mounts. Units were built by Seagrave, Pirsch, Ward LaFrance (Grove), and American LaFrance.

This is the second of several posts that will highlight the progression of these truck companies in Chicago. The numbers listed above are revisions from what was originally included in the 1st post.

IN 1968, CHICAGO RECEIVED THREE PIRSCH REAR MOUNTED AERIALS …

These trucks were built on Mack chassis with CF Series cabs. Each truck had a 100-foot rear mounted aluminum ladder, 300 gallons of water, and a 60-GPM pump.

Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder

Pirsch delivery photo of a 1968 100′ rear mount on a Mack CF chassis for the Chicago Fire Department. Jack Connors collection

  • The first of these 1968 Mack/Pirsch aerials (Shop #E-170) was assigned to Truck 22. This unit was eventually reassigned to Trucks 47, 16, 35, and 34.
Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder Chicago Truck 22

Chicago Truck 22 was assigned Shop #E-170 in 1968. This was a Pirsch 100-foot rear mounted aerial on a Mack CF chassis. It carried 300 gallons of water and had a 60-GPM pump. Jack Connor photo

Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder Chicago Truck 47

Shop #E-170 was assigned to Truck 47 after it had been running as Truck 22. This photo shows a canvas cover for the rear jacks instead of the metal doors that were delivered in that area.  Jack Connor photo

Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder Chicago Truck 35

This image shows the rear of E-170 after it was on it’s 4th assignment now as Truck 35. The booster reel is still mounted on the unit, but it is empty. Jack Connor photo

Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder Chicago Truck 16

Shop #E-170 was assigned to Truck 16 after it served truck 47. This was the second 1968 Mack/Pirsch for Truck 16. Bill Friedrich photo

Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder Chicago Truck 34

After some rehab work and the removal of the booster reels, E-170 was assigned for the last time as Truck 34. Larry Shapiro photo

Chicago Fire Department Truck 34 1968 Mack CF Pirsch

Another image of Truck 34 on-scene this time after the booster tank and reels were removed. Steve Redick photo

  • The next (Shop #E-171) was assigned to Truck 16.
Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder Chicago Truck 16

Shop #E-171 was reassigned to Truck 16. Jack Connors photo

  • The third (Shop #E-172) went initially to Truck 15, then was reassigned to Truck 37 and then Truck 42.
Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder Chicago Truck 15

The 3rd Pirsch in 1968 went to Truck 15. The rear jacks have no cover in this photo. Jack Connors photo

Chicago Fire Department 1968 Mack CF Pirsch aerial ladder Chicago Truck 37

Shop #E-172 was reassigned to Truck 37 after seeing service as Truck 15. Jack Connor photo

 

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Chicago Still & Box Alarm at 47th & Knox 6-27-12

This from reader Eric Haak:

Still & Box Alarm @ 47th and Knox on June 27th.  Engine 34 pulled up just before 1:45 pm to the Right Away Pallet Company and within 2 minutes called for the box.  The area involved was a 125 x 125 storage lot stacked tight with 10-foot tall columns of pallets.  Engine 34 fed Tower Ladder 54 inside the company’s yard while Truck 52 pulled into a lot to the west of the involved area and was fed by Engine 123.  Tower Ladder 39 set up in the empty parking lot to the south of the pallet yard and was fed by Engine 32.  A total of 5 lines were used to bring the blaze under control and 2-2-5 struck out the box @ 2:38.

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire

Heavy fire from the Right Away Pallet Company at 47th & Knox. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 Engine 34

Engine 34 supplied Tower Ladder 54 at the Still & Box Alarm. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire Tower Ladder 39

Tower Ladder 39 was deployed from an adjacent yard. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire

Firefighters change the tip on the waterway of Truck 52 prior to raising the main. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire

Engine 32 was supplying Tower Ladder 39. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire

Truck 52 goes to work inside the pallet yard. Eric Haak photo

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire

A battalion chief climbs Tower Ladder 39 to observe the operations. Eric Haak photo

Hank Sajovic also went to the scene and submitted a few images.

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire

Tower Ladder 54 working the fire. Hank Sajovic photo

Chicago Fire Department Command Van 2-7-3

Comm Van 2-7-3 was at the fire. Hank Sajovic photo

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire

Stacks of charred pallets. Hank Sajovic photo

Chicago Fire Department Still & Box Alarm 47th & Knox 6-27-12 pallet fire

Companies staged on 47th Street. Hank Sajovic photo

 

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Chicago 3-11 alarm fire and EMS Plan 1 with rescues (update)

Dave Statter from Statter911.com posted this video clip of a rescue being made at the 3-11 Alarm fire yesterday at 714 E. 82nd Street.

RAW VIDEO: RESCUE FROM CHICAGO’S ‘HOLY SHIT’ FIRE.

 

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Chicago proposes the Scarlet Letter

The Chicago City Council is proposing an ordinance to identify and brand dangerous buildings with a scarlet ‘X’. The Chicago Tribune reports that:

Firefighters, cops and paramedics arriving at dangerous, vacant buildings would be warned by emergency dispatchers and bright reflective signs under new city efforts to avoid another disaster like the December 2010 roof collapse that claimed the lives of two firefighters.

Earlier this year, the city began compiling a list of dangerous buildings for 911 dispatchers, who will warn first responders en route to those sites. And the City Council Zoning Committee on Monday endorsed a measure to put 2-foot by 2-foot reflective signs, each with a large red “X,” on those buildings.

The entire article can be found HERE.

thanks Chris

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Woman dedicates headstone for firefighter that saved her life

The Chicago Tribune has a human interest story about a Chicago firefighter who died in 1952.

Chicago firefighter John Francis Minich died a hero, collapsing just moments after rescuing several people from a burning apartment building in 1952.

But for nearly six decades, Minich’s body has lain in an unmarked grave in a Des Plaines cemetery, an anonymous resting place among rows of headstones chiseled with names.

That will change Saturday morning, when officials from the Chicago Fire Department and the firefighters union dedicate a headstone marking Minich’s grave at All Saints Catholic Cemetery & Mausoleum.

Also in attendance will be a woman whose lifetime of questions about the firefighter who saved her life led to the recognition of his resting place.

Her mother was eight months pregnant with McCann when the smoky blaze began to spread Oct. 25, 1952, through their apartment building in the 1000 block of West Argyle Street.

Trapped on the third floor, McCann’s mother ignored firefighters shouting at her to jump because she didn’t want to harm her unborn child, McCann said.

Minich already had rescued other residents when he went back into the building to find the trapped woman. He put a wet cloth over McCann’s mother’s mouth and nose and led her through the blinding smoke, according to McCann and a Tribune article about the fire published the next day.

Minich tried to keep McCann’s mother calm as they made their way through the building, asking her what name she planned to give her baby, McCann said. He even promised to visit her and the newborn once the child was born.

Moments after guiding McCann’s mother to a waiting ambulance, the firefighter collapsed, McCann said.

A death notice in the newspaper said Minich was survived by his wife, Marie, and two brothers. A 29-year-old man was later charged with setting the fire after he became upset with his girlfriend, who lived in the building, according to several Tribune stories.

Twelve days after the fire, McCann was born. She had always been intrigued by the story of her mother’s rescue and last year began searching for Minich’s grave.

She asked a friend who works at All Saints, John Stewart, to help her find where Minich was buried. Stewart discovered that Minich and his wife were in unmarked graves.

McCann first visited Minich’s grave on a snowy day in January, and the sight of the nondescript plot left her shaken, she said.

“It really troubled me,” McCann said. “I looked at this entire row, and I thought, ‘Oh my God, he’s a hero. He saved my life. I’m here because of him. And he doesn’t have a marker.’”

McCann told Stewart that she would buy a headstone for Minich. But Stewart told her to wait, and he talked to a neighbor who is a Fire Department captain. The department contacted the firefighters union a short time later, and Mount Emblem Cemetery in Elmhurst soon agreed to donate a black granite headstone. McCann said she also plans to secure a headstone for Minich’s wife.

The complete article can be found HERE.

thanks Chris

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Chicago firefighter’s contract in the news

The Chicago Sun-Times has an article (one of many to come in the coming weeks) discussing the nuances of the CFD union contract which is expiring at the end of June. This article goes into increases in the base salary of many firefighters and chief officers. Excerpts include:

The city of Chicago is paying fire department employees more than $80 million a year for perks that boosted their salaries by an average of more than $15,000 apiece last year, a Chicago Sun-Times analysis finds.

The salary-boosting extras aren’t reflected in the online database of city workers’ pay that Mayor Rahm Emanuel created in what he described as an effort to provide greater transparency for taxpayers about how City Hall operates.

According to the Emanuel administration’s “data portal,” fire department employees made an average of about $87,000 last year. But when you take into account the extras, that boosted the average salary for the department to about $104,000 a year, according to a Sun-Times analysis of city budget data.

Most of the 5,000 members of the department are paid far more than their posted salaries thanks to a long list of provisions negotiated by their union.

That wide, hidden gap between firefighters’ reported salaries and their actual take-home pay is heightening tensions as the firefighters’ union tries to negotiate a new contract with City Hall.

The Sun-Times reported earlier this month that, with the current five-year contract set to expire at the end of June, the Emanuel administration is targeting the perks. Union leaders vowed to fight to hold onto the gains they won under former Mayor Richard M. Daley.

The Chicago Fire Department’s personnel costs totaled nearly $511 million last year, up from $480.2 million in 2010, according to the analysis of all payments the city made to department employees. About $430 million of the 2011 tab was for the regular salaries the Emanuel administration posts online. The rest went toward extras including double-time pay for holidays including Flag Day and “specialty pay” to those who have undergone additional training.

One of the biggest and fastest-growing categories of the additional pay was the 5 percent bonus given to firefighters who are certified divers. The same bonus goes to “Tech A” workers, who have been trained in handling hazardous materials.

Those pay-boosters weren’t part of the previous firefighters’ contract, which expired in 2007. After they were added, firefighters rushed to get them.

By the beginning of this year, nearly 4,000 employees — 80 percent of the department’s personnel — had undergone hazardous-materials training and were getting the 5 percent pay boost — twice as many as had the training in 2008.

The number of certified divers in the department also mushroomed under the current contract — to 367, up from 142 five years ago.

As a result, the cost for speciality pay rocketed from $6.4 million in 2008 to more than $18.3 million last year, city documents show.

Many high-ranking fire department employees also have boosted their salaries. For instance, Dan Fabrizio, a battalion chief who also is political director of the firefighters’ union, made $129,349 in regular pay. But Fabrizio’s actual wages came to more than $154,000, ranking him among the 100 best-paid Chicago fire officials last year.

The only extra that was more costly than specialty pay was “holiday premium” pay: Any fire department employee who works on any of 13 holidays — including Flag Day, June 14 — gets double their regular rate. Holiday premium pay cost the city more than $19.2 million in 2011.

An additional $15 million was paid to fire employees last year for “duty availability” pay — which everybody gets just for being in the department. This benefit sends every firefighter an extra $805 check every three months.

The Emanuel administration is proposing to do away with duty availability pay and to limit specialty pay to “those working in that capacity on a given shift,” according to a letter that Chicago Firefighters Local 2 President Tom Ryan sent his members on May 25. Ryan promised to “continue to vigorously fight these insulting, ridiculous proposals.”

The entire article can be found HERE.

Also part of the article is a list of the top 100 fire department salaries.
Total pay rank Name Job description Base salary Extras Total pay
1 Hoff, Robert Fire Commissioner $198,459.00 ($8,204.66) $190,254.34
2 Durkin, John Ambulance Commander $112,872.00 $71,725.93 $184,597.93
3 Wojtecki, Kenneth Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $34,293.19 $179,636.19
4 Alvarez, Robin Ambulance Commander $108,883.50 $70,580.67 $179,464.17
5 Chikerotis, Steve Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $32,339.01 $177,682.01
6 Stewart Iii, Charles First Deputy Fire Commissioner $184,350.00 ($8,236.08) $176,113.92
7 Mc Kee, Robert Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $29,427.07 $174,770.07
8 Mungovan, James Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $29,142.40 $174,485.40
9 Shehan, John Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $29,142.40 $174,485.40
10 Powell, Curtis Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $27,188.24 $172,531.24
11 Roszkowski, Paul Ambulance Commander $110,936.50 $61,015.83 $171,952.33
12 Howard, Larry Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $25,945.74 $171,288.74
13 Alexander, James Ambulance Commander $106,290.00 $64,449.60 $170,739.60
14 Elmore, Clinton Ambulance Commander $112,872.00 $57,186.13 $170,058.13
15 Brennan, Patrick Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $24,133.94 $169,476.94
16 Callahan, Michael Deputy Fire Commissioner $174,975.00 ($7,055.85) $167,919.15
17 Falls, Richard Ambulance Commander $112,872.00 $54,460.68 $167,332.68
18 Vasquez, Anthony Deputy Fire Commissioner $174,975.00 ($7,740.68) $167,234.32
19 Petersen, Jack Deputy District Chief $133,056.50 $32,939.37 $165,995.87
20 Fox, Michael Asst Deputy Fire Commissioner $172,803.00 ($6,950.12) $165,852.88
21 Mc Nicholas, John Asst Deputy Fire Commissioner $172,803.00 ($7,007.08) $165,795.92
22 Flaherty, Patrick Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $33,787.32 $163,136.32
23 Edgeworth, Richard Deputy Commissioner $172,803.00 ($9,689.12) $163,113.88
24 Sweeney, Thomas Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $33,112.12 $162,461.12
25 Von Bergen, Thomas Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $32,757.35 $162,106.35
26 Lyons, Christophe Battalion Chief – EMT $126,084.75 $35,956.33 $162,041.08
27 Little, Stephen Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $32,390.34 $161,739.34
28 Santucci, Joseph Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $32,283.70 $161,632.70
29 Knapp, Jerry Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $16,233.23 $161,576.23
30 Leahy, Thomas Captain – EMT $118,345.00 $42,959.41 $161,304.41
31 Sanchez, Jesse Deputy District Chief $145,343.00 $15,928.84 $161,271.84
32 Gubricky, Michael Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $31,619.97 $160,968.97
33 Finneke, Gary Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $31,597.33 $160,946.33
34 Crooker, Mitchell Battalion Chief-Paramedic $132,537.00 $28,399.26 $160,936.26
35 Doggett, David Chief Helicopter Pilot/EMT $125,610.00 $34,890.79 $160,500.79
36 Lopez, Roberto Ambulance Commander $112,872.00 $47,511.67 $160,383.67
37 Mc Millin, Stephen Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $30,950.90 $160,299.90
38 Cooper, Richard Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $30,795.75 $160,144.75
39 Barrett, Michael Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $30,711.40 $160,060.40
40 Annis, Curt Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $30,633.39 $159,982.39
41 Collins, John Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $30,573.49 $159,922.49
42 Kane, Margaret Battalion Chief-Paramedic $128,696.00 $31,044.38 $159,740.38
43 Bleicher, Lewis Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $30,067.42 $159,416.42
44 Mc Andrew, Guy Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $30,035.05 $159,384.05
45 Jones, Rosalind Battalion Chief – EMT $125,610.00 $33,741.33 $159,351.33
46 Bresnahan, Raymond Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $29,841.68 $159,190.68
47 Arnswald, Thomas Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $29,741.17 $159,090.17
48 Dory, Richard Battalion Chief-Paramedic $130,630.86 $28,261.64 $158,892.50
49 Gloude, Joseph Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $29,517.43 $158,866.43
50 Benson, Mark Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $29,323.46 $158,672.46
51 Kelly, James Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $29,145.45 $158,494.45
52 Basile, Lee Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $29,130.44 $158,479.44
53 O Driscoll, Sean Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $29,077.10 $158,426.10
54 Gibbons, Timothy Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $28,963.41 $158,312.41
55 Oliver, Michael Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $28,703.57 $158,052.57
56 Carroll, Joseph Battalion Chief – EMT $118,398.50 $39,625.67 $158,024.17
57 Timothy, Michael Battalion Chief $123,371.00 $34,543.07 $157,914.07
58 Sullivan, Michael Battalion Chief – EMT $125,610.00 $32,272.68 $157,882.68
59 Cunningham, Daniel Battalion Chief – EMT $127,192.50 $30,632.16 $157,824.66
60 Strocchia, John Fire Engineer $90,957.00 $66,705.45 $157,662.45
61 Ford Ii, Richard Deputy Fire Commissioner $157,622.00 ($4.32) $157,617.68
62 Conroy, Michael Battalion Chief-Paramedic $130,321.00 $27,222.68 $157,543.68
63 Townsend, Mark Battalion Chief – EMT $125,610.00 $31,901.33 $157,511.33
64 Mc Shane, Scott Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $28,113.36 $157,462.36
65 Del Dotto, Larry Ambulance Commander $112,872.00 $44,577.76 $157,449.76
66 Mc Cann, James Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $28,029.47 $157,378.47
67 Hanson, Steve Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $27,285.50 $156,634.50
68 Biondo, Peter Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $27,285.50 $156,634.50
69 Lynch, John Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $27,075.41 $156,424.41
70 Flynn, Sean Commander $114,856.75 $41,478.59 $156,335.34
71 Leon, Gabriel Ambulance Commander $112,872.00 $43,029.11 $155,901.11
72 Burke, Sean Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $26,407.32 $155,756.32
73 Kurcab, Gregory Battalion Chief – EMT $127,192.50 $28,492.52 $155,685.02
74 Koffski, Richard Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $26,331.89 $155,680.89
75 Stauffer, Paul Battalion Chief – EMT $125,610.00 $30,060.11 $155,670.11
76 Niego, Charles Battalion Chief – EMT $125,610.00 $30,028.52 $155,638.52
77 Doherty, Edward Battalion Chief – EMT $125,610.00 $30,027.84 $155,637.84
78 Gniot, Thomas Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $26,137.91 $155,486.91
79 Gurrola, George Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $25,858.92 $155,207.92
80 Stuecklen, Jeff Battalion Chief – EMT $125,610.00 $29,448.37 $155,058.37
81 Paramore, John Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $25,673.69 $155,022.69
82 Milton, Thomas Battalion Chief – EMT $127,192.50 $27,808.19 $155,000.69
83 Jablonowski, James Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $25,603.57 $154,952.57
84 O Donnell, James Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $25,598.80 $154,947.80
85 Witt, Keith Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $25,596.57 $154,945.57
86 Timothy, Lori Ambulance Commander $103,119.00 $51,791.42 $154,910.42
87 Hunter, Derrick Battalion Chief $123,371.00 $31,509.86 $154,880.86
88 Leonard, John Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $25,518.55 $154,867.55
89 Ryan, Kevin Battalion Chief – EMT $126,084.75 $28,772.78 $154,857.53
90 Cleary, Patrick Battalion Chief – EMT $125,610.00 $29,134.01 $154,744.01
91 Dietz, David Battalion Chief – EMT $126,084.75 $28,658.17 $154,742.92
92 Rinaldi, Julie Ambulance Commander $109,519.00 $45,210.79 $154,729.79
93 O Donnell, James Battalion Chief $123,371.00 $31,348.25 $154,719.25
94 Ryan, Edward Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $25,360.86 $154,709.86
95 Altman, Michael Battalion Chief $119,804.00 $34,771.44 $154,575.44
96 Lobianco, Michael Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $25,221.98 $154,570.98
97 Konop, Randall Battalion Chief – EMT $118,398.50 $36,136.47 $154,534.97
98 Strong, Eric Battalion Chief-Paramedic $121,325.00 $33,145.97 $154,470.97
99 Fabrizio, Dan Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $24,843.94 $154,192.94
100 Doyle, Kevin Battalion Chief – EMT $129,349.00 $24,791.54 $154,140.54
Source: City of Chicago
Note: Some management-level personnel had money deducted from base pay because of unpaid furlough days. Deductions are shown in parentheses.

 

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CFD showcases new mobile ambulance bus

An article in the Chicago Tribune introduces the new CFD (Medical Ambulance Bus) 8-8-12 to the city.

 A bus-sized ambulance that allows treatment of 13 patients at a time was unveiled today by the Chicago Fire Department, along with new heart monitors for all fire ambulances.

A custom-built CFD EMS patient transport bus was purchased with about $500,000 grant funds from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, allowing emergency treatment and transport for 13 patients, according to a CFD news release.

It has an onboard staff of four and is equipped with Automatic External Defibrillators and pulmonary support equipment including oxygen and emergency care drugs.

“The Chicago Fire Department’s EMS patient transport bus is the first of its kind in Illinois and will be used for any incident where multiple patient transports can be consolidated for delivery of more efficient care and resource management,” said Fire Commissioner Jose Santiago.

The CFD also announced 12-Lead ECG monitors are now in all advanced life support ambulances, which will allow paramedics to more quickly diagnose heart attacks.

“With the 12-Lead ECG monitors in place in all of the CFD’s 60 ALS ambulances, we have upgraded to the most advanced mobile cardiac diagnostic tool currently available for heart attack patients,” Santiago said in the release.

The complete article is HERE.

thanks Ron

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