Posts Tagged Chicago Engine 99

Chicago Ambulance 86

This from Drew Gresik:

Hey guys,
I noticed you don’t have a photo of Ambulance 86 on the page for Engine 99. I got a nice shot you guys can use to fill that void.
Interesting thing to note, Engine 99’s quarters don’t have enough room for a newer F-Series ambulance, so, they have been running a late 90’s Ford E-350/McCoy Miller. For the last few years, they were using C995. It had all LED lights and a temporary number plate on the sides of the box. Within the last couple of weeks, they have received another late 90’s Ford E-350/McCoy Miller with shop number C955. This rig has all strobe lights and has “86” marked on the sides. Pretty cool to see an old rig still up front and quite busy too.
Thanks,
Drew Gresik
Chicago FD Ambulance 86

Chicago BLS Ambulance 86. Drew Gresik photo

Tags: , , , , ,

Chicago 4-11 Alarm Fire 12-29-12 (pt 5)

Fifth article about the 4-11 Alarm fire on Saturday at 2444 W. 21st Place in Chicago.

Images from Dave Weaver:

 

Chicago 4-11 Alarm massive fire at commercial warehouse facility 12-29-12 at 2444 S. 21st Street

Big header seen while approaching the scene from the north on Western Avenue. Dave Weaver photo

Chicago 4-11 Alarm massive fire at commercial warehouse facility 12-29-12 at 2444 S. 21st Street

Massive fire and smoke consume the building at 2444 W. 21st Street in Chicago on 12-29-12 as seen from the northwest. Dave Weaver photo

Chicago 4-11 Alarm massive fire at commercial warehouse facility 12-29-12 at 2444 S. 21st Street

Firefighters from Engine 23 with Tower Ladder 5 (using a spare apparatus) monitor a multi-versal at the west end of the block . Dave Weaver photo

 

Images from Dan McInerney:

Chicago fire department engine pumping at fire

Engine 18. Both 18 & 5 pumping to the fireground and connected to hydrants using hard suction. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago fire department engine pumping at fire

Engine 5 pumping to the Tower Ladder 39. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago FD Air Mask Unit 6-4-4-

Air Mask Unit 6-4-4. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago fire department engine pumping at fire

E109 pumping to E23 which was under the viaduct. 109 was a still engine and connected two sections of 4 inch hose to the hydrant. The remaining engines arriving connected via hard suction hose per CFD operating procedures for large fires. Engines arriving on the 2-11 alarm and above will make their connections using the 6 inch hard suction hose. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago fire department engine

E99 was sent to lay lines if needed to the roof to cover flying brands. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago fire engine pumping at a fire scene

E44 pumping to a multi-versal on the southeast corner of the building. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago fire engine pumping at a fire scene

E103 seen receiving water from E28 down the street from the east and from a hydrant. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago fire engine pumping at a fire scene

E65 is seen pumping to E26. E65 is shown connected to the hydrant using the lightweight suction hose. There are two types of lightweight suction hose – the first is hose that is to be used for suction only (negative pressure) and not to be connected to a pressurized hydrant (positive pressure). The type of lightweight suction hose the CFD now issues to rigs is reinforced internally to be able to withstand positive pressure. Dan McInerney photo

fire hydrant being used during a fire

The type of lightweight suction hose the CFD now issues to rigs is reinforced internally to be able to withstand positive pressure. The reinforcing matrix is visibile as a white colored lattice underneath the clear sections of the hose. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago Fire Department truck 52

T52 – rig shot while in staging. Dan McInerney photo

CTA Emergency Response Unit

CTA emergency unit 202. This unit respond citywide for any emergency involing the EL tracks or CTA property. In this case they responded to the scene due to the fire’s proximity to the Pink Line, which was shut down early on in the fire. Dan McInerney photo

People's Gas Company crew working at fire scene

Peoples Gas was requested to shut down the gas to the building. To do so, they had to dig a hole in the street, which is visible here underneath the sheets of plywood and cones. It was later requested they use their front end loader to clear the street of bricks from the collapse so TL54 could be moved west down 21st St. to better wash down the ruins. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago Fire Department engine working at fire scene

E23 (still engine) took a postion underneath the railroad viaduct directly to the west of the fire building. This spot left the rest of 21st St. open for responding truck companies, and also provided them some protection from falling debris should the building collapse. The viadust later flooded due to the fire streams being used on the building. At it’s height there were at least 11 master streams being employed. At a slightly conservative 500gpm each, a minimum of around 6000gpm for 2 plus hours will flood any viaduct, and they usually do flood. Dan McInerney photo

Chicago Fire Department Truck 7 at fire scene

T7 rig shot ( RIT truck at the 4-11). Dan McInerney photo

Chicago Fire Department Truck 48 at fire scene

Truck 48 with the ladder to the roof of a nearby building. Dan McInerney photo

4-11 alarm commercial building fire in Chicago 12-29-12 at 2444 W. 21st Street

Unmanned multiversals on the SW corner of the fire building. Dan McInerney photo

The previous post was HERE.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Chicago 2-11 Alarm fire 5-2-11

Chicago Engine 99 was dispatched to what was believed to be a rubbish fire last night in the rear of 3401 S. Lawndale Avenue, a location with guard dogs. Upon arrival, Engine 99 reported that the fire was inside the building and asked for a working fire response. Shortly thereafter the alarm was elevated to a full Box Alarm. Thick black smoke was escaping from the building which could be seen from several blocks away. 2-2-4 (Deputy District 4) reported fire through the roof on his arrival and escalated the alarm to a 2-11. The fire was in an industrial brick building with a steel deck roof. Snorkel 1, Tower 5, and Tower 54 used elevated master streams in addition to several 2-1/2″ hand lines.

Gordon J. Nord, Jr. was in the area and spotted the smoke from several blocks away. He arrived as companies were cutting the overhead doors to gain access to the building. He submitted several images depicting the progression of the fire attack.

Chicago 2-11 alarm fire 3401 S Lawndale 5-2-11

Fire from the roof and thick black smoke from inside the building are visible as firefighters cut into a steel overhead door to gain access. Gordon J. Nord, Jr. photo

Chicago 2-11 alarm fire 3401 S Lawndale 5-2-11

Firefighters direct a hand line into the building upon getting access to the fire. Gordon J. Nord, Jr. photo

Chicago 2-11 alarm fire 3401 S Lawndale 5-2-11

Engine 99 puts their deck gun into operation as fire burns through the roof. Gordon J. Nord, Jr. photo

 

Chicago 2-11 alarm fire 3401 S Lawndale 5-2-11

The deck gun from Engine 99 puts water on the roof as master streams from Squad 1, Tower Ladder 5 and Tower Ladder 54 prepare to go to work as well. Gordon J. Nord, Jr.

Chicago 2-11 alarm fire 3401 S Lawndale 5-2-11

A heavy volume of fire burns inside the building and through the roof. Gordon J. Nord, Jr. photo

Chicago 2-11 alarm fire 3401 S Lawndale 5-2-11

Two tower ladders and Squad 1's Snorkel were working in addition to the deck gun from Engine 99 and several hand lines. Gordon J. Nord, Jr. photo

 

Gordon has a complete gallery which can be viewed HERE.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Chicago 2-11 & EMS Plan I 1/01/11

A fire on New Year’s Day which apparently began on the rear porches escalated into a 2-11 Alarm with an EMS Plan I at 4315 W. 25th Place. The Chicago Tribune reports (HERE) that six people were injured including three Chicago firefighters. After receiving multiple calls, the Englewood Fire Alarm Office ¬†boxed the fire before the first companies arrived. Engine 99 was first on the scene and reported that they had rear porches burning. Firefighters rescued two residents from the second floor via ground ladders from the 2-1/2 story frame building. The three firefighters were transported with non-life-threatening injuries.

Tim Olk arrived on the scene in the early stages of the fire and was able to capture several striking images. Tim has a complete gallery which can be viewed HERE.

Chicago Fire Department 2-11 Alarm Fire 4315 W. 25th Place

A firefighter from Squad 1 climbs down a ladder after ventilating windows on the second floor as heavy flames escape. Tim Olk photo

Chicago Fire Department 2-11 Alarm fire at 4315 W. 25th Place

Heavy fire pushes from the second floor of the building. The fire is believed to have originated on a rear porch and subsequently trapped the second floor residents who were rescued by firefighters. Tim Olk photo

Chicago Fire Department 2-11 Alarm fire at 4315 W. 25th Place

Fire takes over the balance of the second floor as firefighters inside the building work to extinguish the flames. Tim Olk photo

Chicago Fire Department 2-11 Alarm fire at 4315 W. 25th Place

A battalion chief checks the progress of exterior companies after the fire on the second floor has been knocked down. Tim Olk photo

Chicago Fire Department 2-11 Alarm fire at 4315 W. 25th Place

Three Chicago firefighters were transported from the fire scene with various non-life-threatening injuries sustained while fighting the fire on 25th Place. Here, several firefighters work together to remove one of the injured firefighters from the building. Tim Olk photo

Chicago Fire Department 2-11 Alarm fire at 4315 W. 25th Place ice on firefighter

Temperatures were below freezing this morning as evidenced by the ice covering this Chicago battalion chief at the 2-11 alarm fire. Tim Olk photo

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,